Channel - Irish Lecture Series
8/14/2018 5:55:50 PM

Channel Videos

The Centenary 2016 and its Depiction of the Role of Women- Fall 2017
Thursday, October 5, 2017 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM Irish curator and historian, Sinéad McCoole. Irish curator and historian, Sinéad McCoole, returns to the University of St. Thomas to present a lecture on an exhibition she curated for the Irish Government on women for the centenary of the Easter 1916 Rising entitled Mná 1916-2016. Sinéad has explored 100 years of Irish women in politics and public life across the island of Ireland before partition. She traced the lives of over 300 women, including nationalists, unionists, pacifists and those who took part in the action of the Rising. The Government has shown this exhibition in Dublin, Cork, Cavan, Waterford, Louth, Galway and Donegal. In 2012, the Irish Government selected Sinéad as one of 10 historians to serve on an Expert Advisory Group for the Decade of Centenaries 2012-2022. In 2015, she was the first Irish historian to address the Irish cabinet, when the cabinet meeting took place in the home of Countess de Markievicz at Lissadell, County Sligo.
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10/21/2017 3:36:48 PM
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"The Jig is Up!" Benefit Concert
The Jig Is Up! is a little piece of Ireland created in Houston. Bound together by a love of traditional Irish music, the five members of The Jig Is Up! have formed a band that remains true to tradition while presenting their music in a creative and upbeat style. The group features Larry Mallette who plays the flute, Judd Heartsill on accordion and melodeon, Matt Lewis on rhythm guitar, Diehl Moran on the fiddle and Robert Shaddox on the bodhrán. Larry Mallette is a fourth generation Irish American and has been playing the Irish flute since 1994. He has performed in Ireland and across the United States and has taught whistle workshops at the North Texas Irish Festival and Jackson Mississippi Celtic Festival. Judd Heartsill has been playing the button accordion since 1998. In addition to his love of music, Judd is an accomplished professional seaman. Diehl Moran has been playing the fiddle since the age of five and has been on the traditional music scene in Houston for many years. Robert Shaddox discovered his love for traditional music in County Cork while staying with a host family. He has been playing the bodhrán for 14 years and also provides vocals for the group. Matt Lewis solidifies the musical arrangements with his rhythmic guitar playing and has been influenced by the music and musicians of west Kerry. Date: February 1, 2012 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 75 mins
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6/6/2016 3:29:45 PM
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A Lonestar Stout Evening with Celtic Musician Jed Marum and Special Guest Hugh Morrison
Celtic Musician Jed Marum and special guest Hugh Morrison perform a mix of Irish ballads, stories, and songs celebrating Irish and American heritage. Date: March 12, 2009 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 118 min
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6/6/2016 5:53:35 PM
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A Tale of Two Hemispheres: Charles Gavan Duffy & the 19th Century Irish Experience
Charles Gavan Duffy had a rich life. A founder and editor of the Irish nationalist newspaper, the Nation, a leader of the Young Ireland movement, and a tenant rights advocate, he became Prime Minister of Australia and then returned to Ireland to become involved in Irish cultural national politics in the last years of his life. As a wealthy moderate Irish Catholic nationalist, Duffy’s life is not representative of the nineteenth-century Irish experience, but it does epitomize both the global dimensions of that experience and the complexity of the Irish nationalist relationship to the British empire (Duffy was ennobled for his service in Australia). By charting Duffy’s global journey from Ireland to Australia and back, this talk is designed to provide a rich sense of both the complexity and significance of the nineteenth century Irish experience. Dr. Sean Farrell is Associate Professor of History at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb and he serves as President of the American Conference for Irish Studies. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in modern Irish and British History. His primary research and teaching interests focus on the history of imperialism, nationalism, sectarianism, violence, power and popular culture in Ireland and Northern Ireland, as well as the history and influence of the Irish Diaspora. Dr. Farrell serves as the editor of the New Hibernia Review, an Irish Studies journal. He is the author and editor of several books on nineteenth-century Irish history, including Rituals and Riots: Sectarian Violence and Political Culture in Modern Ulster, 1784-1886, which won the Donald Murphy Prize for Distinguished First Book in Irish Studies. He currently is completing a book on the Working Class and the Church of Ireland in Early Victorian Belfast and he is preparing to work on a biography of the nineteenth-century Irish nationalist intellectual and politician, Charles Gavan Duffy. Speaker: Dr. Sean Farrell Date: November 15, 2012 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 87 mins
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5/25/2016 10:02:09 PM
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An Evening with Ken O'Malley
Speaker(s): Ken O'Malley Date: March 2, 2006 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 112 mins Description: The Irish bardic tradition continues in the guise of Dublin-born and reared Ken O’Malley, widely regarded as the finest Irish folk singer/songwriter in the United States today. O’Malley will transport the listener down Raglan Road, Skibbereen and other conjured places where words and music express a longing for what is lost, defiance for what is taken, laughter for foolishness and irreverence for what is sacred.
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1/12/2017 7:31:02 PM
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An Evening with Máire Ní Chathasaigh & Chris Newman
Speaker(s): Máire Ní Chathasaigh & Chris Newman Date: March 1st, 2007 Location: Cullen Length: 102 mins Description: Irish harpist Máire Ní Chathasaigh and acoustic guitarish Chris Newman will perform music from their new album 'Firewire', which blends Irish dance-music with bluegrass.
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10/12/2016 8:37:43 PM
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Biolink: A Renaissance in Irish Technological Innovation
Speaker(s): Denis Headon, PhD Date: October 5th, 2006 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 60 mins Description: Dr. Denis Headon, president of BioLink USA - Ireland, a cooperative organization bringing together specialists in the life sciences in the US and Ireland, highlights some of the innovations pioneered by the Irish. He also discussed the emergence of a technological renaissance in Ireland by giving insights into contemporary Irish technological, scientific and medical innovation.
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10/12/2016 4:10:58 PM
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Caimin OBrien - Stories from a Sacred Landscape from Pagan Country to Christian Ireland
Speaker(s): Caimin OBrien Date: March 29th, 2007 Location: Cullen Hall Length: approx 60 mins
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4/12/2016 5:46:50 AM
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Cause or Cure – The Role of Religion in a Fear-Filled World
The Reverend Harold Good, an acknowledged peacemaker in Ireland and beyond, returns to UST to present his lecture titled, "Cause or Cure – The Role of Religion in a Fear-Filled World." This presentation will acknowledge and explore the hugely destructive role of religion that has become distorted, following religion through history to modern day. Rev. Good will encourage reflection well beyond personal faith to explore what each of us has to contribute to heal the hurts of a broken world. This lecture will focus on who we ALL are within the WHOLE people of God and as people of faith, from an ecumenical perspective, regardless of specific faith or belief. The former president of the Methodist Church in Ireland, Rev. Good has played a key role in bringing about peace in Northern Ireland and continues to work on building bridges within the community and resolving conflict. Rev. Good was one of two members of the clergy entrusted by paramilitaries to witness the final decommissioning of weapons of the Provisional Irish Republican Army in 2005. A native of Northern Ireland, Rev. Good spent several years in Ohio and Indiana as a student and pastor before returning to Northern Ireland in the 1970s. Rev. Good has demonstrated a lifetime commitment to peace, justice and reconciliation. During his time as Methodist Church leader, he joined Northern Ireland’s other main church leaders to press for peace and engage in talks with Irish and British political leaders, as well as more discreetly building understanding and trust with and between Loyalist and Republican activists. Known for his ministry on the streets of Northern Ireland, Rev. Good has displayed both physical and spiritual courage in working to reconcile the Protestant and Catholic communities, and urging the end to violent action and reaction. Rev. Good also has served as a mentor for our study abroad program in Northern Ireland on peace and reconciliation.
Reverend Harold Good
9/7/2016 12:00:00 AM
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Celtic Balladeer - An Evening of Story and Song
Speaker(s): Danny O'Flaherty Date: September 29th, 2007 Location: Jones Hall Length: 123 mins Description: Back by popular demand, Celtic Balladeer Danny O’Flaherty will take us on a tour of the West of Ireland through songs of his native Aran Islands and other parts of Ireland. Known for his rich, soulful voice and his dedication to preserving Celtic heritage, Danny O’Flaherty has been entertaining audiences around the country for over 30 years.
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10/12/2016 4:01:15 PM
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Celtic Spirituality and its Contribution to the Roman Catholic Church
The Roman Catholic Church has been endowed with numerous schools of spirituality, normally stemming from the giftedness or charism of an individual in reference to one’s approach to God. Celtic Christian Spirituality cannot trace its origins to one person, even though many Irish would place St. Patrick at the top of the list. Rather, numerous individuals and events have come together to mold a heritage and way of life somewhat distinctive to the Emerald Isle. Few Catholic Americans can claim they have not been influenced by the embodiment of this spirituality within their own education. The elusiveness, yet popularity, of the phraseology presents its own challenge in unlocking how Celtic Spirituality emerges as an area of personal growth. Certainly the "Carmina Gadelica," the peregrinatio pro christo, the doctrine of the Trinity, the emphasis on penance, and the breastplate of St. Patrick are integral to our own understanding of this pathway to God. Sister Madeleine Grace, CVI, a member of the Congregation of the Incarnate Word and Blessed Sacrament in Houston. She holds degrees from the University of Houston in social science, St. Mary’s University in San Antonio, Texas, in theology and St. Louis University in St. Louis, Mo., in historical theology. Her specific area of specialization is early Church history coupled with a keen interest in spirituality. She currently is an associate professor in the UST Department of Theology. Speaker: Sr. Madeline Grace, CVI Date: February 7, 2013 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 48 mins
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6/1/2016 12:58:28 AM
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Challenges for Ireland as a Knowledge based Economy
Speaker(s): Dr. Fergal McGrath Date: September 19th, 2007 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 90 mins Description: Ireland is undergoing rapid change as an economy and society. The success of the economy over the last 10 years has drastically altered the Irish landscape, social norms and practices. Building on the foundation laid in Dr. Joseph McFadden’s Celtic Tiger presentation last spring, this fall Dr. Fergal McGrath of the University of Limerick will outline the ever-changing nature of the Irish economy and present a perspective on the social changes taking place.
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10/12/2016 4:57:48 PM
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Charity and the Great Hunger: The Kindness of Strangers
Dr. Christine Kinealy, Professor of History and Director of Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute, Quinnipiac University, presents "Charity and the Great Hunger: The Kindness of Strangers." The Great Irish Famine was one of the most devastating humanitarian disasters of the nineteenth century. In a period of only five years, Ireland lost approximately one-quarter of her population through a combination of death and emigration. A lesser-known aspect of the Famine is the extent to which people throughout the world mobilized to provide money, food and clothing to assist the starving Irish. Many donors had no connection with Ireland; yet, without the kindness of these strangers, many, many more lives would have been lost. Speakers: Dr. Christine Kinealy Date: February 5, 2014 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 75 mins
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6/3/2016 2:28:51 AM
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Dancing at Lughnasa 15 Years Later
In this presentation, which includes watching the 95-minute film adaptation of Brian Friel’s award-winning play, Dr. Janet Lowery of UST's Department of English briefly highlights distinctions among critics’ views on both the play and film, discusses historical backdrops, and foregrounds the power of the ensemble cast and the fate of its characters in this film. She also introduces some contemporary developments in the Irish theater scene and European culture that suggest the far-reaching insights of Friel’s vision. Directed by Pat O’Connor (Circle of Friends), with the screenplay by Irish playwright Frank McGuinness, and music by Bill Whelan, the film stars Meryl Streep, Michael Gambon, Catherine McCormack, Sophie Thompson, Kathy Burke, Brid Brennan and Rhys Ifans, and is narrated in voice over by Gerard McSorely. Note: The film Dancing at Lughnasa is available from Amazon.com instant video streaming service. Fees may apply. Link (if link does not work, simply search for the film at www.amazon.com). Speaker: Dr. Janet Lowery Date: September 27, 2013 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 32 mins
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6/14/2016 2:24:15 PM
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Dick Dowling: Early Days in Ireland and Texas
Many years of hard work of Ann Caraway Ivins, a long-time Friend of the Center, has come to fruition in the publication of Dick Dowling: Galway’s Hero of Confederate Texas through Irish author Tim Collins. Collins presents aspects of the book focusing on Dowling’s early days in Tuam, County Galway, Ireland, how he found his way from Galway to Texas, and his contributions in Texas and particularly Houston. Collins follows Dowling’s journey from famine stricken Galway to New Orleans and his rise from penniless immigrant to successful businessman against all the odds, while still in his teens. His arrival in Houston in the late 1850s and his marriage to the daughter of Irish immigrants, at a time when the city was booming, meant that life for the young Dowling looked promising. Yet, with secession came war, and the rest, as they say, is history. Speaker: Tim Collins Date: September 9, 2013 Location: Ahern Room, Crooker Center Length: 64 mins
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5/3/2016 5:47:57 PM
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Early Irish Saints’ Lives: St. Brigid and St. Brendan
Dr. John McNamara, from the UH English Department, explores the somewhat less well known cultural memories of Sts. Brigid and Brendan, together with their continuing influence on the development of medieval Christianity both in Ireland and on the Continent. Speaker(s): Dr. John McNamara Date: September 17, 2009 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 72 mins
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6/14/2016 5:43:06 PM
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Easter 1916 Rising: An Historical Perspective
As stated on the Irish Government Website, “[t]he events of 1916 must be viewed against the backdrop of the broader nationalist movement, the convictions of those who opposed any weakening of the link with the Crown and the momentous events being played out on the battlefields of Europe in one of the bloodiest conflicts that the world had ever seen. It should be noted that the continuing threat of conscription brought about by the manpower needs of the war consolidated the growing rift within the popular opinion. The ongoing frustration within Nationalist Ireland at the lack of progress on Home Rule, the prospect that it would not even be for the whole island, reinforced by the refusal of the British War Office to allow the creation of a distinctly Irish Brigade, and its rejection of even an Irish divisional badge, was compounded by the abhorrence of the executions.” Professor Lee states: “The surprising feature of the Rising of April 1916, at least in light of the hallowed republican dictum that ‘England’s danger is Ireland’s opportunity,’ was not that it took place, but that it took place so late.” Lee, Ireland 1912-1985 Politics and Society, p. 24. The leaders of the Rising were aware that they needed more men, ammunition and coordination throughout the country; however, they feared World War I would end and so would their opportunity to rise. Professor Joe Lee is the Director of the Glucksman Ireland House at New York University. He also is Glucksman Chair of Irish History and Professor of Irish Studies and History. Professor Lee came to New York University in 2002 from University College Cork, where he chaired the History Department and served for periods as Dean of Arts and as Vice President. Educated at University College Dublin, the Institute for European History in Mainz, Germany, and Peterhouse, Cambridge, he has also been a Fellow of Peterhouse, and held Visiting Fellow/Professor appointments as Senior Parnell Research Fellow in Irish Studies at Magdalene College, Cambridge; the Austrian Academy, Vienna; the European University, Florence; the University of Edinburgh; Mellon Professor, University of Pittsburgh; Distinguished Professor of World Peace, LBJ Graduate School of Public Affairs, University of Texas at Austin; and Exchange Professor of Government at Colby College. His books include The Modernization of Irish Society, 1848-1918 and the prize-winning Ireland 1912-1985: Politics and Society. Professor Lee’s op-ed columns for the Sunday Tribune have been collected and published as “The Shifting Balance of Power: Exploring the 20th Century.” Along with Marion R. Casey, he edited Making the Irish American: The History and Heritage of the Irish in the United States. Professor Lee’s research interests have included nineteenth and twentieth century Irish, European, British, German and most recently Irish-American history and politics, as well as nationalism, imperialism, and post-colonialism. Professor Lee’s current research focuses on nineteenth-century Irish nationalist Michael Davitt and on Irish and Irish-American historiography in a trans-national context.
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1/12/2017 7:08:13 PM
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From Protest to Peace: A Lecture by Bogside Artist Tom Kelly from Derry, Northern Ireland
Speaker(s): Tom Kelly Date: February 11, 2009 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 70 mins
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6/6/2016 5:22:44 PM
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Genetic Genealogy: Discussion, Debate and DNA
Genealogy is the oldest known Irish academic discipline; inscriptions written on ogam stones at the time of St. Patrick were used to encode the ancestry of important local warlords. This interest continued through the middle ages and into the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries when one’s genealogical background was vital to those seeking officer posts in foreign armies and in making claims to land. In more recent eras, genealogical research has been fostered and developed in particular by the Irish diaspora who have deepened our understanding immeasurably by quarrying non-Irish sources to immense effect. To the traditional tools of the historian, science has now added the study and analysis of human DNA, allowing us to take snapshots of family history for periods in which documentary evidence is lacking. For its full value to be appreciated, however, this DNA evidence has to be evaluated in light of surname history and linguistic etymologies of particular names. This presentation provides an overview of current investigations and their potential in what is still, despite its ancient status, a continuously evolving field. Speaker: Dr. Catherine Swift Date: October 2, 2013 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 67 mins
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6/22/2016 4:26:32 PM
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High-kingship of Tara- Making Irish Kings Christian
The site of Tara in Ireland has been iconic throughout recorded Irish history. Because of its symbolism as the “capital” of Ireland, Daniel O’Connell held one of his monster meetings there in the nineteenth century. Tara is renowned as the palace of the ancient high-kings of Ireland in mythological and legendary literature. It was a cemetery that was in continuous use since the Neolithic period – and, in the Iron Age, it was a temple associated with kingship. The early Christian clergy sought to transform the pagan kingship of Ireland and make it a Christian institution. For this reason, the biographers of St. Patrick brought him to Tara to convert the Irish nation from the top down. This presentation will focus on the way in which the stories were used to bring about this change and why Tara, although a pagan place, was of such importance to them. Some of the texts that the clergy created were taken to Europe and became the basis of a Christian theory of kingship – one of the many gifts of the Irish to early medieval Europe. Dr. Doherty is a graduate of St. Columb’s College in Derry. He received his MA from University College Dublin. He was elected a scholar in the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. He retired as statutory lecturer of History and Archives, University College Dublin, in 2012. In 2012–13, he spent a year on a project in the Centre for Advanced Study in the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. He is currently editing, along with Jan Eric Rekdal, the book King and Warrior in Early Northwest Europe. Dr. Doherty served as president of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland from 2009–13. He has written on economic history, the lives and legends of St. Patrick and St. Brigit, on kingship and most recently on the mythology of Lough Ree.
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11/10/2016 9:43:06 PM
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Intersection & Illumination: New Insight into Ancient Irish Tales
The ancient myths of pre-Christian Ireland, which were written down by Christian monks in early medieval times, include the earliest vernacular literature in Europe. Treasured for their rich language, vivid characters, captivating stories and gripping examinations of such universal themes as love, honor and the cost of war, these enduring tales are also valuable for the light they shed on the culture and customs of the people who created them. In this lecture, Susan Gallagher will tell and examine stories from the Mythological Cycles in historical context, drawing from archeological, literary, legal and numismatic sources. Gallagher believes that stories have the ability to heal, enlighten and transform, and that a tale spoken aloud in a face to face encounter between teller and listener has a particular power. She grew up listening to traditional tales in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn, New York in an Irish-American family in which the beauty of language was deeply valued. She has performed and has presented workshops in schools, libraries, museums and festivals. Before Gallagher began telling, she practiced law and was involved in a variety of social justice work. Speaker(s): Susan Gallagher Date: September 15, 2011 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 77 mins
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6/1/2016 12:00:11 AM
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Irish Catholic Southerners, Becoming American: A Literary Odyssey
Have you ever read The Awakening? Or heard of Kate Chopin? Are you familiar with Uncle Remus? Have you seen “Gone With the Wind”? Or, more recently, have you seen “No Country for Old Men”? What all of these things have in common is a connection to Irish Catholic writers from the American South. This interactive lecture will offer the audience an engaging account of writers who invented a regional mythos by setting them in context of their times and literary work. Derived from the award-winning book, Irish Catholic Writers and the Invention of the American South (LSU Press, 2013), the presentation investigates the remarkable literary legacy of Irish-American southern writers. It considers the ways in which these writers responded to the demands of Catholicism, regional loyalty and Irish identity. Their story is one of courage and enduring creativity. Bryan Giemza (Ph.D., J.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; B.A., Notre Dame) teaches and writes in Chapel Hill, where he lives with his wife, Kristi, and his children, John Paul and Vera Rose. Bryan is director of the Southern Historical Collection at the University of North Carolina. His literary history, Irish Catholic Writers and the Invention of the American South (Louisiana State University Press, 2013) was recognized with the 2014 South Atlantic Modern Language Association’s Studies Award, which is given annually to an academic text that “reflects the highest standard of scholarship and criticism and offers a significant contribution to the field.” Speakers: Bryan Giemza (Ph.D., J.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; B.A., Notre Dame) Date: February 4, 2015 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 61 mins
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6/2/2016 10:26:03 PM
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Irish Contributions to the Science of Medicine by John P. Cooke, M.D., Ph.D.
Dr. John P. Cooke will discuss the history of the contribution of Irish scientists and physicians to the advancement of medical diagnosis and therapy. He will also introduce his contribution to the field, focusing on his research on how to reverse aging of the heart and vessels. Dr. Cooke is Professor of Medicine and Chair of the Department of Cardiovascular Sciences at the Houston Methodist Research Institute and the Director of the Center for Cardiovascular Regeneration in the Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center in Houston. Dr. Cooke trained in Cardiovascular Medicine at the Mayo Clinic and obtained a Ph.D. in physiology there. Subsequently, Harvard Medical School recruited him as an Assistant Professor of Medicine. In 1990, Stanford University recruited him to spearhead the program in Vascular Biology and Medicine, and he was Professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, and Associate Director of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute until his recruitment to the HMRI in July 2013.
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4/5/2017 12:00:00 AM
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Irish Literary Revival’s Influence on the Easter 1916 Rising
No doubt poetry and theatre played a huge role in the events that led to the Easter Rising, but it is unlikely that any of the volunteers who saw action on Easter week signed up for combat solely because they read patriotic poems or attended nationalist plays. This lecture will explore the influence of literature and culture on Irish nationalist debate in advance of the Rising. Dr. P.J. Mathews is a Senior Lecturer in the School of English, Drama and Film at University College Dublin, and has written widely on Irish literature and theatre. He is co-editor (with Declan Kiberd) of Handbook of the Irish Revival (Abbey Theatre Press, 2015), author of Revival: the Abbey Theatre, Sinn Féin, the Gaelic League and the Co-operative Movement (Field Day, 2003) and editor of The Cambridge Companion to John Millington Synge (CUP, 2009). He is a member of the Governing Board of Ireland’s national broadcaster, RTÉ; Director of Academic Podcasting for UCDscholarcast (www.ucd.ie/scholarcast); and an Associate Member of the Irish Studies Colloquium, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3. He was appointed Naughton Fellow and Visiting Associate Professor of English at the University of Notre Dame for 2007-08, and was Director of the Parnell Summer School, 2002-05. Speaker: Dr. P.J. Mathews Date: February 4, 2016 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 67 mins
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6/3/2016 3:47:49 AM
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Irish performer Sean Tyrrell presents “Cry of the Dreamer-The Amazing Story of Irish Hero John Boyle
Speaker(s): Sean Tyrrell Date: October 8, 2008 Location: Jones Hall Length: 118 mins Description: Irish singer, musician and storyteller Seán Tyrrell presents the story of John Boyle O’Reilly (1844-1890) through song, music, poetry and other writings. O’Reilly was a visionary and a poet with the heart of a rebel, the courage of a freedom fighter, the commitment of a civil rights activist and the blood of a true born Irishman. He was persecuted, condemned and banished from Ireland to the Penal Colonies in Australia for his political beliefs and activities.
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10/20/2016 9:31:04 PM
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Irish Saints in Medieval Ireland: Models of Local Spirituality
Speaker: Dr. Catherine Swift Date: October 8, 2013 Location: Ahern Room, Crooker Center Length: 63 mins
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6/22/2016 4:36:26 PM
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Kilmainham Gaol
Speaker(s): Niall Bergin Date: November 1st, 2007 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 72 mins Description: Niall Bergin discusses the impact of the Kilmainham jail on the history of Ireland.
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10/21/2016 6:25:29 PM
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Mosaics of Faith: The Irish Experience - Part I
Mosaics of Faith: The Irish Experience presents a comprehensive perspective of Christian Ireland, from those early years when the seeds of faith were planted on the island to the current years of peace and reconciliation. Two-part lecture: Rev. Bill Shaw, Director, 174 Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland: Crossing the Divide: Learning to Walk in Another’s Shoes Rev. Harold Good, former President of the Methodist Church of Ireland, Belfast, Northern Ireland: “Dealing with the Past”: Can Our Faith Release Us and Heal Us? Speaker(s): Lori Gallagher, Rev. Bill Shaw, Rev. Harold Good Date: April 14, 2010 Location: Scanlan Room, Jerabeck Center Length: 110 mins
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6/3/2016 4:26:54 AM
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Mosaics of Faith: The Irish Experience - Part II
Mosaics of Faith: The Irish Experience presents a comprehensive perspective of Christian Ireland, from those early years when the seeds of faith were planted on the island to the current years of peace and reconciliation. Lecture: Dr. Peter Harbison, Royal Irish Academy, Dublin, Ireland: Walking in the Paths of Early Irish Christians: Monasteries, Crosses, and Pilgrimages Speaker(s): Lori Gallagher, Dr. Robert Ivany, Dr. Peter Harbison Date: May 5, 2010 Location: Scanlan Room, Jerabeck Center Length: 77 mins
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6/2/2016 10:27:43 PM
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My Life With The Clancy Brothers
Speaker(s): Mary Clancy Date: October 31st, 2006 Location: Scanlon Length: 72 mins Description: Ms. Clancy discusses her research on "various problems during and after the Second World War and how people and families coped with these economically difficult years in Ireland."
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10/20/2016 9:20:55 PM
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No Ordinary People: The Role of Irish Artists in Irish Revolutionary Politics 1900-1923
In the first decades of the twentieth century, Ireland saw an explosion of cultural activity. Those who took part in the Easter 1916 Rising, the Irish War of Independence and the Irish Civil War were at the forefront of creating a new culture for Irish people. There was an explosion of interest in the Irish language, writing, drama, music and art. Irish historian and author Sinéad McCoole explores the role of Irish artists and culturally active women in the evolution of these artistic and cultural aspects of Irish heritage and political and social development. Speaker(s): Irish Historian and Author Sinéad McCoole from County Mayo, Ireland Date: October 27, 2010 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 70 mins
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6/14/2016 3:01:41 PM
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Northern Ireland Conflict and Peace: Lessons Learned
Speakers: Lori Gallagher Date: November 14, 2013 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 71 mins
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5/31/2016 11:31:54 PM
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Northern Ireland: Steps Toward Reconciliation and Peace
Speaker(s): Rev. Bill Shaw Date: September 14th, 2006 Location: Jones Hall Length: 60 mins Description: Rev. Shaw discusses community-based solutions for reconciling the conflict between Northern Irish Catholics and Protestants. His organization, the 174 Trust, is a nondenominational Christian community organization, that pursues peaceful cross-cultural interaction at a grassroots level.The Trust seeks to provide an inclusive, nonthreatening and neutral environment for individuals and groups to gain access to programs by inviting community members to participate in united activities.
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10/12/2016 4:03:26 PM
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Northern Ireland: Stumbling Blocks and Stepping Stones
Speaker(s): Rev. Harold Good, Fr. Alec Reid Date: October 10, 2007 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 96 mins Description: Rev. Harold Good and Fr. Alec Reid speak on the stumbling blocks and stepping stones that were encountered on the road to peace in Northern Ireland.
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10/21/2016 6:25:31 PM
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O'Carolan's Farewell to Music
O'Carolan's Farewell to Music brings to the stage the legendary life, the turbulent times and the captivating music of one of Ireland’s most beloved and celebrated artists: Turlough O’Carolan. Interspersed with performances of 14 of O'Carolan's tunes played on the rare wire-strung harp, the play tells the blind harper's story through the character of poet and harper, Charles MacCabe, O'Carolan's life-long friend and traveling companion. Through MacCabe's eyes and O'Carolan's music, we are drawn into one of the most storm-tossed chapters of Irish history. Patrick Ball is one of the premier Celtic harpers in the world today and one of the very few to perform exclusively on the rare, legendary wire-strung harp — the harp of O'Carolan. Date: April 15, 2015 Location: Cullen Hall Duration: 100 Mins
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6/15/2016 4:48:27 PM
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Poetry & Peace: Michael Longley, Seamus Heaney & Northern Ireland
Dr. Richard Rankin Russell is an Associate Professor of English at Baylor University, where he teaches modern and contemporary British and Irish literature. He earned his Ph.D. and M.A. in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He also holds an M. Phil. in English Literature (Modernism) from the University of Glasgow in Scotland. This talk will focus on how several poems by both Michael Longley and Seamus Heaney explore the impact of the "Troubles" in Northern Ireland and how poetry offers a model of cultural understanding and dialogue that can point a way beyond calcified identities. Dr. Russell has published extensively on Irish and Northern Irish literature, including his edited collection of essays, Martin McDonagh: A Casebook (Routledge, 2007), along with the monographs Bernard MacLaverty (Bucknell UP, 2009), and Poetry and Peace: Michael Longley, Seamus Heaney, and Northern Ireland (Notre Dame UP, 2010). His book-length study of place in Brian Friel is under consideration by Syracuse UP and he has just finished a book on Seamus Heaney and regionalism. Dr. Russell is a reviewer for Irish Studies Review, Studies in the Novel and New Hibernia Review. He was named outstanding professor at Baylor in 2003-04 for distinctive scholarship by an untenured faculty member and has been a Fellow for summer seminars at the National Humanities Center, The Aspen Institute and for Liberty Fund. Speaker(s): Dr. Richard Rankin Russell Date: November 17, 2011 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 79 mins
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10/26/2016 4:13:18 PM
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Return to Flight Mission
Speaker(s): Eileen Collins Date: April 29th, 2007 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 63 mins Description: Irish-American U.S. Air Force Colonel, retired, Eileen Collins will present a lecture about the STS-114 Discovery flight. The STS-114 Discovery (July 26-Aug. 9, 2005) was the first "return to flight" mission after the loss of Columbia on Feb. 1, 2003. She will narrate an 18-minute video and present several still photographs of the earth from space, as well as describe the mission and her experiences as an astronaut.
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10/20/2016 9:37:56 PM
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Reviving a Hollow and Spiritually Toxic Culture: The Roots of Violence and the Gravitational Power of Crucified Love
Saint John Vianney Catholic Church and The Donald S. Nesti, CSSp Center for Faith & Culture at the University of St. Thomas proudly present the Archbisop Joseph A. Fiorenza Lecture. This year's lecture is titled "Reviving a Hollow and Spiritually Toxic Culture: The Roots of Violence and the Gravitational Power of Crucified Love." The lecture will be delivered by Dr. Gil Bailie, founder and president of the Cornerstone Forum, at Saint John Vianney Catholic Church.
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11/14/2016 5:14:06 PM
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Ritual & Belief Transformed Under Empire: Effects of Rome’s Conquests on the Celts
The William J. Flynn Center for Irish Studies and the Houston Society of the Archaeological Institute of America present The Celtic Project lecture series. The second lecture is entitled "Ritual and Beliefs Transformed Under Empire: Effects of Rome’s Conquest on the Celts" and focuses on how recent archaeological discoveries in Ireland are transforming our understanding of the Roman impact on religion in Iron Age Europe. The rituals and beliefs practiced by the Celts are preserved in places where they worshiped and in the objects they left behind. Dr. John Soderberg will explore how, through these artifacts, Ireland offers insights into Iron Age religions and how worship changed in the wake of the Roman Empire. Dr. John Soderberg is the Managing Director of the Anthropology Laboratories at the University of Minnesota and President of the American Society of Irish Medieval Studies. His main research interest is the development of large religious centers in Ireland from the Iron Age to the Middle Ages. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota and his M.A. from the Irish Studies Program at Boston College. Speaker(s): Dr. John Soderberg Date: February 15, 2012 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 87 mins
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6/20/2016 2:48:47 PM
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The Beauties of Bernard MacLaverty's 'Grace Notes'
Speaker(s): Dr. Richard Rankin Russell Date: Jan. 23, 2008 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 67 mins Description: Dr. Rankin focuses on the birth of his protagonist Catherine McKenne's two New Creations.
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10/12/2016 5:53:35 PM
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The Celtic Tiger: A Period of Rapid Economic Growth in Ireland
Speaker(s): Dr. Joseph McFadden Date: February 1st, 2007 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 54 mins Description: The "Celtic Tiger" period began in the mid-1990s and lasted until the global economic downturn of 2001. From 1994 to 2000 GNP rate growth ranged between 6 and 11%, falling through 2001 and early 2002 to 2%, the level at which the economy had been growing in the early 1990s. During this period Irish living standards rose dramatically to equal then eventually surpass those of most other states in Western Europe.
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10/12/2016 4:21:22 PM
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The Early Irish Church: The City of God in Early Ireland
Speaker(s): Charles Doherty Date: March 13th, 2008 Location: Scanlan Rm, Jerabeck Length: 60 mins Description: The study of the church in early Ireland has engendered much debate. It is popularly viewed as being predominantly monastic. Of course this is true, but the role of the bishop has been reassessed in recent years and the debate has entered a new phase. It is still commonly said that there were no towns in early Ireland apart from those established by the Norse. This lecture will address the current debate about the nature of the early Irish church. It will examine the monasteries as settlements a
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10/12/2016 4:29:42 PM
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The 'Greatest Generation,' Irish Style
The 'Greatest Generation,' Irish Style: The Mid-Twentieth Century Re-invention of the Irish in America Noted author, editor and poet, Jim Rogers, managing director of the University of St. Thomas (Minnesota) Center for Irish Studies, ventures south to share his expertise on the Irish in America. This far-ranging talk looks at the Irish American community in the decade-and-a-half before the election of John F. Kennedy. Taking issue with those who say the Irish in America jettisoned their cultural distinctiveness in the (supposedly) conformist years of the 1950s, Rogers argues that the Irish American community re-invented itself in new, creative ways, often deliberately staying outside the mainstream. Novels (The Last Hurrah), plays (Finian's Rainbow), movies (The Quiet Man) sitcoms (The Honeymooners), and music (the Clancy Brothers) all came together to create an Irish American efflorescence. Irishness in midcentury America assuredly had not faded. Speaker(s): Jim Rogers Date: November 18, 2010 Location: Scanlan Room, Jerabeck Center Length: 79 mins
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6/17/2016 6:47:01 PM
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The Irish Harp - It's History, Repertoire and Role in Irish Society
Award-winning harpist Máire Ní Chatasaigh is one of Ireland's most important and traditional Irish musicians. Using her knowledge of the idiom of the living oral Irish tradition, she developed a variety of new techniques, particularly in relation to ornamentation, with the aim of establishing an authentically traditional style of harping. She appears here with Chris Newman, one of the UK's most influential acoustic guitarists. Speaker(s): Máire Ni Chatasaigh Date: April 19, 2006 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 82 mins
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6/3/2016 2:29:12 AM
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The Irish Language - a Lecture by Joe Mac Donnacha
Speaker(s): Joe Mac Donnacha Date: April 26, 2007 Location: Cullen Hall
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6/6/2016 8:14:26 PM
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The Queen Comes to Ireland: The Story of Queen Victoria's Four Visits
Queen Victoria visited Ireland four times during her 63-year reign as the Queen of England and the British Empire. The visits took place in: 1849, 1853, 1861, and 1900. The purpose and results differed for each trip to Ireland. None of the visits was a “state visit.” All were characterized as “private” visitations. A characterization for each visit would be as follows: 1849: reassuring; 1853: enabling; 1861: peaceful; 1900: a missed opportunity. We will discuss each of these visits and their impact on Irish history. Dr. McFadden received his Ph.D. from Northern Illinois University in American History with a minor in Modern European History and Russian History. He has traveled extensively in Ireland and taught at Mary Immaculate College in Limerick, Ireland. He has been with UST since 1988, teaching as a history professor since 1997, and serving as president between 1988 and 1997 and again as interim president in Spring 2004. Dr. McFadden founded the Center for Irish Studies in 2002 and the Center opened in January 2003. Speaker: Dr. Joseph McFadden Date: April 11, 2013 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 76 mins
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6/14/2016 4:01:08 PM
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The Reel Thing: Traditional Music by the Brock McGuire Band
Speaker(s): Brock McGuire Band Date: February 28th, 2008 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 120 mins Description: Master musicians Paul Brock, Enda Scahill, Manus McGuíre and Denis Carey evoke the atmosphere and artistry of the Irish dance hall era in dazzling fashion with their Irish traditional music from the West of Ireland featuring the melodeon, tenor banjo, fiddle and acoustic piano.
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10/21/2016 8:58:15 PM
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The Role of Irish Americans in the History of American Catholicism
Speaker(s): Dr. David O’Brien Date: March 30th, 2006 Location: Scanlan Rm, Jerabeck Length: 60 mins Description: The lecture will concentrate on three turning points in US Catholic History: (i) the formation of the American Church under John Carroll when Carroll and his immediate successors experienced interference from Ireland; (ii) the “Americanist Crisis” in the late nineteenth century when Irish-American Catholic leaders divided over the future of the American church, with significant consequences; and (iii) Vatican II, when the Irish-American domination of Catholic life and culture came to an end.
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10/26/2016 3:59:02 PM
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The Spanish Armada in Ireland, 1588-1589
Lecture by Dr. Joseph McFadden, UST President Emeritus and professor of history, on the landing of the Spanish Armada in Ireland and the fate of the survivors. Speaker(s): Dr. Joseph McFadden Date: April 28, 2011 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 78 mins
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6/14/2016 4:54:24 PM
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Whisperings of Ireland by Storyteller Batt Burns
As a child, Batt Burns experienced the seanachie (storyteller) tradition firsthand when he lived with his grandfather in the Hills of County Kerry, and heard him tell stories by the fire during the harsh winter nights. Today Burns helps to preserve that Irish heritage with haunting accounts of ghosts, great adventure stories, tales of heroes, farcical stories and witty jokes. In his recitations of poetry, he draws on the rich field of Irish poets including W.B. Yeats, Oscar Wilde, Patrick Kavanagh, Padraic Colum, Brendan Kennelly and Seamus Heaney. Speaker(s): Batt Burns Date: February 10, 2010 Location: Cullen Hall Length: 93 mins
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4/16/2016 12:29:47 AM
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